Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - Lebenswissen­schaftliche Fakultät - Institut für Psychologie

M. Sc. Lea Katharina Kunz

Foto
Name
M. Sc. Lea Katharina Kunz
Status
Stipendiat/in
E-Mail
lea.katharina.kunz (at) hu-berlin.de

Einrichtung (OKZ)
Lebenswissenschaftliche Fakultät → Institut für Psychologie → Occupational Health Psychology
Sitz
Rudower Chaussee 18 , Raum 1'221
Telefon
(030) 2093-9349

Office hours:

by arrangement

 

Research interests

Information and communication technologies (ICTs)

Work after hours

Recovery and recovery experiences

 

Dissertation project

Working with digital tools and their effects: Differences regarding work-related ICT use and health effects

The increasing spread of information and communication technologies (ICTs) is leading to major changes in working and private life. Using ICTs for professional purposes has both positive and negative consequences. The aim of this research project is to investigate which factors have an influence on the direction of the impact of ICTs on well-being and health indicators in employees. Therefore, we investigate whether specific ICT usage events after work as well as their evaluation may be responsible for the different impact directions. By understanding the underlying processes, we aim to better understand which working conditions (e.g., availability after hours) can promote health and well-being under which circumstances.


Project head: Lea Katharina Kunz, Prof. Dr. Antje Ducki (Berliner Hochschule für Technik), Prof. Dr. Annekatrin Hoppe


Duration: 2019-2023

 

Education

Since 2019      PhD Candidate, Humboldt University Berlin

2018                M.Sc. Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin

2015                B.Sc. Psychology, Chemnitz University of Technology

 

Professional Experience

Since 2019     Doctoral research assistant, Berliner Hochschule für Technik

2018-2019      Research Analyst, i-potentials GmbH Berlin

 

Memberships

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychologie (DGPs), Fachgruppe Arbeits-, Organisations- und Wirtschaftspsychologie